The heat is on, be sure to stay hydrated!

Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion is a condition whose symptoms may include heavy sweating and a rapid pulse, a result of your body overheating. It’s one of three heat-related syndromes, with heat cramps being the mildest and heatstroke being the most severe.

Causes of heat exhaustion include exposure to high temperatures, particularly when combined with high humidity, and strenuous physical activity.

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion may develop suddenly or over time, especially with prolonged periods of exercise. Possible heat exhaustion signs and symptoms include:
 
Cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat
Heavy sweating
Faintness
Dizziness
Fatigue
Weak, rapid pulse
Low blood pressure upon standing
Muscle cramps
Nausea
HeadacheContact your doctor if your signs or symptoms worsen or if they don’t improve within one hour. If you are with someone showing signs of heat exhaustion, seek immediate medical attention if he or she becomes confused or agitated, loses consciousness, or is unable to drink. You will need immediate cooling and urgent medical attention if your core body temperature (measured by a rectal thermometer) reaches 104 F (40 C) or higher.
(Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heat-exhaustion/symptoms-causes/syc-20373250)

Heatstroke

Heatstroke is a condition caused by your body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. This most serious form of heat injury, heatstroke, can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F (40 C) or higher. The condition is most common in the summer months. Heatstroke requires emergency treatment. Untreated heatstroke can quickly damage your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. The damage worsens the longer treatment is delayed, increasing your risk of serious complications or death.

 

High body temperature: A core body temperature of 104 F (40 C) or higher, obtained with a rectal thermometer, is the main sign of heatstroke.
Altered mental state or behavior: Confusion, agitation, slurred speech, irritability, delirium, seizures and coma can all result from heatstroke.
Alteration in sweating: In heatstroke brought on by hot weather, your skin will feel hot and dry to the touch. However, in heatstroke brought on by strenuous exercise, your skin may feel dry or slightly moist.
Nausea and vomiting: You may feel sick to your stomach or vomit.
Flushed skin: Your skin may turn red as your body temperature increases.
Rapid breathing: Your breathing may become rapid and shallow.
Racing heart rate: Your pulse may significantly increase because heat stress places a tremendous burden on your heart to help cool your body.
Headache: Your head may throb.If you think a person may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical help. Call 911 or your local emergency services number.Take immediate action to cool the overheated person while waiting for emergency treatment.(Source: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heat-stroke/symptoms-causes/syc-20353581)

Summer is here and with it comes Severe Weather

Understand Severe Weather Alerts

What is the difference between a National Weather Service Severe Thunderstorm Watch and a Severe Thunderstorm Warning? 

  • Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Be Prepared! Severe thunderstorms are possible in and near the watch area. Stay informed and be ready to act if a severe thunderstorm warning is issued. The watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states.
  • Severe Thunderstorm Warning: Take Action! Severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Take shelter in a substantial building. Get out of mobile homes that can blow over in high winds. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area (around the size of a city or small county) that may be impacted by a large hail or damaging wind identified by an NWS forecaster on radar or by a trained spotter/law enforcement who is watching the storm.(Source: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/thunderstorm/ww.shtml)

Understand Tornado Alerts

What is the difference between a Tornado Watch and a Tornado Warning issued by the National Weather Service?

  • Tornado Watch: Be Prepared! Tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. Review and discuss your emergency plans and check supplies and your safe room. Be ready to act quickly if a warning is issued or you suspect a tornado is approaching. Acting early helps to save lives! Watches are issued by the Storm Prediction Center for counties where tornadoes may occur. The watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states.
  • Tornado Warning: Take Action! A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. There is imminent danger to life and property. Move to an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building. Avoid windows. If in a mobile home, a vehicle, or outdoors, move to the closest substantial shelter and protect yourself from flying debris. Warnings are issued by your local forecast office. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area (around the size of a city or small county) that may be impacted by a tornado identified by a forecaster on Radar or by a trained spotter/law enforcement who is watching the storm (Source: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/tornado/ww.shtml)

 Fire safety videos and tips

1. Close your door-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUqjNF_DNkQ

A simple nighttime routine can wind up saving countless lives: close the door! Researchers are finding that fire spread is occuring far more rapidly with modern home furnishings, which often incorporate synthetic, petroleum-based products as coverings and stuffing. Simply closing the bedroom door at night can provide more survivable temperatures, higher oxygen concentrations, and reduced exposure to carbon monoxide for occupants if a fire ignites outside the room. In conjunction with creating a simple barrier to fire and toxic smoke, preparing escape plans for each member of the family is paramount.

2. Hands only CPR-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_49wMpdews

There are many risk factors for a heart attack, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, a history of stroke, obesity, or diabetes. Signs and symptoms of a heart attack vary by individual but there are several common signs: shortness of breath; pain in the jaw, neck, back, shoulder, or chest; feeling faint. IF A HEART ATTACK IS SUSPECTED, DIAL 911 IMMEDIATELY.